Tag Archives: Bali

Jeremy Jauncey Of Beatiful Destinations Shares His Top Travel Spots
By Jeremy Jauncey April 29, 2019

Is there anything more exciting than visiting a place you’ve never been before? A place you’ve read about, heard about from friends, or seen on social media? Jeremy Jauncey, founder of Beautiful Destinations, takes us on a tour of stunning spots in these beautiful countries that cater to the very best in luxury travel

There is nothing more important in life than travel. It is a force for good in the world, which motivates and inspires people to get acquainted with new cultures, expand their horizons, and connect with others in a way no other experience can.

The right kind of travel (respecting the environment and the people you meet) can break down barriers of race, age, and religion, among others, making the world a better and more enjoyable place. It is with this mindset that I am excited to be joining the Tatler family in Asia to share my experiences with you and, I hope, spark a moment that will excite you to look outside your day to day and get out into the world and explore.

Photo: Courtesy of Jeremy Jauncey
Photo: Courtesy of Jeremy Jauncey

Arguably the coolest place in the world, it has a vibe so unique it transcends sport, music, culture, and food—some of this nation’s most famous exports. Long famed for its all-inclusive resorts, the island has seen an exciting revival amongst luxury travellers in the know. It is home to three stunning properties: Roundhill, Golden Eye, and Half Moon—icons with decades of history that have been rediscovered by jetsetters.

The real Jamaica, however, is to be found outside the hotels, sipping a Red Stripe at Dougies Bar, enjoying Caribbean gastropub food at The Summer House in the Liguanea Club, or floating down the Martha Brae on a river raft with Captain Murphy. For those looking for a beach destination rich in culture and people as warm as the climate itself, Jamaica is the place to be this year.

Photo: Courtesy of Nihi Sumba
Photo: Courtesy of Nihi Sumba

Close(ish) to home is an island paradise that has been voted the World’s Best Hotel by Travel + Leisure for two years in a row. A short flight from Bali into the Sumbanese jungle, Nihi Sumba is the definition of rugged luxury. With a unique surf break, swimming horses, and completely unspoilt marine life just a stone’s throw from a huge expanse of private beach, active travellers are spoilt for choice. 

For those looking to relax, the Spa Safari is the only one of its kind in the world and when coupled with sunrise walks on the beach or yoga atop the cliffside ridge, creates a wellness experience second to none. Nihi Sumba is couple and family-friendly—there’s even a chocolate factory for the kids!

See also: 48 Hours In Bali

Photo: Zuzana Hnídková
Photo: Zuzana Hnídková

Don’t let the doom and gloom of Brexit put you off from visiting Scotland, an hour’s flight from London and home to some of the most stunning scenery in the British Isles. Recent years have seen significant investment in luxury accommodation from Borthwick Castle just outside Edinburgh to the highland hotels of Killiehuntly Farmhouse or The Fife Arms, “Scotland’s Hottest Hotel.”

Country pursuits have been a long time favourite of visitors to Scotland and whisky tasting at the Macallan Estate or at Lindores Abbey Distillery is a must. With the pound falling to its lowest level in two years amidst Brexit uncertainty, there has never been a better time to visit due to more affordable costs.

See also: 10 Things To Know About The Macallan's New Distillery

Photo: Courtesy of Jeremy Jauncey
Photo: Courtesy of Jeremy Jauncey

On the eastern side of the Himalayas, nestled between India and China, lies the quiet yet magnificent Bhutan. The country is known for its striking landscapes, ornate monasteries, ancient temples (such as Tiger’s Nest), and an incredible commitment to sustainability.

Many don’t know the extent to which it treasures the land—currently, 60 per cent of Bhutan’s forests are protected under constitutional law, making it the only carbon-negative country in the world. As a conservation focused company, Beautiful Destinations has partnered with local creators and the Bhutanese government to capture the beautiful mindset and scenery of this country.

See also: Mongol Magic: Inside Mongolia's Exclusive Mutton Cup Polo Tournament

Jeremy Jauncey Of Beautiful Destinations Shares His Top Travel Spots
By Jeremy Jauncey April 29, 2019

Is there anything more exciting than visiting a place you’ve never been before? A place you’ve read about, heard about from friends, or seen on social media? Jeremy Jauncey, founder of Beautiful Destinations, takes us on a tour of stunning spots in these beautiful countries that cater to the very best in luxury travel

There is nothing more important in life than travel. It is a force for good in the world, which motivates and inspires people to get acquainted with new cultures, expand their horizons, and connect with others in a way no other experience can.

The right kind of travel (respecting the environment and the people you meet) can break down barriers of race, age, and religion, among others, making the world a better and more enjoyable place. It is with this mindset that I am excited to be joining the Tatler family in Asia to share my experiences with you and, I hope, spark a moment that will excite you to look outside your day to day and get out into the world and explore.

Photo: Courtesy of Jeremy Jauncey
Photo: Courtesy of Jeremy Jauncey

Arguably the coolest place in the world, it has a vibe so unique it transcends sport, music, culture, and food—some of this nation’s most famous exports. Long famed for its all-inclusive resorts, the island has seen an exciting revival amongst luxury travellers in the know. It is home to three stunning properties: Roundhill, Golden Eye, and Half Moon—icons with decades of history that have been rediscovered by jetsetters.

The real Jamaica, however, is to be found outside the hotels, sipping a Red Stripe at Dougies Bar, enjoying Caribbean gastropub food at The Summer House in the Liguanea Club, or floating down the Martha Brae on a river raft with Captain Murphy. For those looking for a beach destination rich in culture and people as warm as the climate itself, Jamaica is the place to be this year.

Photo: Courtesy of Nihi Sumba
Photo: Courtesy of Nihi Sumba

Close(ish) to home is an island paradise that has been voted the World’s Best Hotel by Travel + Leisure for two years in a row. A short flight from Bali into the Sumbanese jungle, Nihi Sumba is the definition of rugged luxury. With a unique surf break, swimming horses, and completely unspoilt marine life just a stone’s throw from a huge expanse of private beach, active travellers are spoilt for choice. 

For those looking to relax, the Spa Safari is the only one of its kind in the world and when coupled with sunrise walks on the beach or yoga atop the cliffside ridge, creates a wellness experience second to none. Nihi Sumba is couple and family-friendly—there’s even a chocolate factory for the kids!

See also: 48 Hours In Bali

Photo: Zuzana Hnídková
Photo: Zuzana Hnídková

Don’t let the doom and gloom of Brexit put you off from visiting Scotland, an hour’s flight from London and home to some of the most stunning scenery in the British Isles. Recent years have seen significant investment in luxury accommodation from Borthwick Castle just outside Edinburgh to the highland hotels of Killiehuntly Farmhouse or The Fife Arms, “Scotland’s Hottest Hotel.”

Country pursuits have been a long time favourite of visitors to Scotland and whisky tasting at the Macallan Estate or at Lindores Abbey Distillery is a must. With the pound falling to its lowest level in two years amidst Brexit uncertainty, there has never been a better time to visit due to more affordable costs.

See also: 10 Things To Know About The Macallan's New Distillery

Photo: Courtesy of Jeremy Jauncey
Photo: Courtesy of Jeremy Jauncey

On the eastern side of the Himalayas, nestled between India and China, lies the quiet yet magnificent Bhutan. The country is known for its striking landscapes, ornate monasteries, ancient temples (such as Tiger’s Nest), and an incredible commitment to sustainability.

Many don’t know the extent to which it treasures the land—currently, 60 per cent of Bhutan’s forests are protected under constitutional law, making it the only carbon-negative country in the world. As a conservation focused company, Beautiful Destinations has partnered with local creators and the Bhutanese government to capture the beautiful mindset and scenery of this country.

See also: Mongol Magic: Inside Mongolia's Exclusive Mutton Cup Polo Tournament

image

courtesy of Courtesy of Capella Lodge

The idea is that you'll only do it once, thus your honeymoon is one of those high-stakes trips to plan. "Nowadays, with more couples marrying later in life, often after years of already living together, the honeymoon is a great time to make a shared check off of the bucket list destination trip, and do something bigger, bolder, or over a longer period of time than usual. The honeymoon is about making memories and stories to last a lifetime," says Joan Roca, founder of the bespoke travel site the Essentialist. Roca, who has planned honeymoons to everywhere from the Seychelles (his recommended place to stay is the Raffles hotel in Praslin) to Kyoto, says his advice, while common sense, often gets overlooked in the planning: give yourselves a few days to readjust to the new time zone and remember that shared discovery is important, so try and go some place neither of you have been.

Now we break down our 50 T&C approved honeymoon destinations, plus where you should stay in each place. We've got all types of travelers covered—from a trek across the Serengeti to private islands, one of which only allows 400 people at a time, to food and wine destinations to urban escapes.

1 Santa Barbara, California

Recently recognized in both The New York Times’52 Places to Go in 2019” and AFAR’sWhere to Go in 2019,” Santa Barbara is bringing serious destination buzz to romantics who want a city-meets-beach escape. When you need a bit of activity, Santa Barbara has wine & craft beer tasting rooms, cool eateries, art galleries, street murals and more. Our pick of where to stay: The Hotel Californian for its rooftop pool with a panoramic view of the Pacific and their luxurious Moroccan-style Spa Majorelle with a one-of-a-kind couples treatments.

Hotel Californian BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

2 Kohala Coast, Big Island, Hawaii

Hawaii and honeymoon are rather synonymous, but venture of the beaten path a little bit and head to the Kohala Coast of the Big Island, where one of the most swimmable beaches (Hapuna Beach) is located. Adventures can go flight-seeing on a helicopter experience or take a nighttime snorkel to view manta rays. We recommend the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel, a mid-century, open floor plan masterpiece from Laurance S. Rockefeller that features cantilevered stairways and hallways donning a museum-worthy collection of Asian Pacific Art.

Mauna Kea Beach Hotel BOOK NOW

3 Big Sur, California

A land of sweeping views known for its mind-body-soul getaways and retreats, Big Sur has towering redwoods, whimsical meadows, and the Pacific coastline. To indulge in the quintessential (and romantic) Big Sur experience, head to the Ventana Big Sur, for its infinity-edge hot tub, clothing-optional Mountain pool and adjacent Japanese hot baths.

Ventana Big Sur BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

4 Maui, Hawaii

They know how to do honeymoons on Maui. The island has a romantic, but relaxed feel, with enough culinary options to eat a different restaurant every night, whale watching during certain times of the year, and gorgeous beaches and even rain forests if you are up for a day trip. Soak it all in at Hotel Wailea, an adult only, all suite property overlooking three Hawaii islands.

Hotel Wailea
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5 Punta Mita, Mexico

A 1,500 acre coastal peninsula in the Riveria Nayarit region is an oasis of wellness and indulgence. Located on the west coast of Mexico, there are surf villages, whale watching, and a host of biodiversity, not to mention a wild, untamed feel if you venture beyond the luxury hotels and golf courses. The Four Seasons Resort Punta Mita has unique spiritual activities like a chakra balancing ritual, an intention burning ceremony, and yoga atop a rock. All of these are offered as part of the property's Soulcation package that is a mix of spa, wellness, culinary (a chef will meet you to discuss your dietary restrictions), art activities, with an oceanfront suite to retreat to in between.

Four Seasons Resort Punta Mita

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6 Lake Como, Italy

Boating, pasta, lounging by a fresh saltwater pool. Isn't that what a honeymoon is supposed to be? Lake Como is an upscale resort area (George Clooney has a home here) set against the dramatic scenery of the Alps. Il Sereno Lake Como is the first contemporary luxury hotel on Lake Como. The property has 30 spacious waterfront rooms with floor to ceiling windows. It's new world meets old world in one of the most romantic settings in the world.

Il Sereno Lake Como BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

7 Pacific Harbor, Fiji

Remote, tranquil, with crystal clear water, Fiji is the ultimate place to decompress post wedding. Fiji is a haven of luxury properties, many with their own private island. Is there anything more romantic than being alone in the middle of nowhere? Nanuku, a part of the Auberge Resorts Collection, offers guests the option of renting out the resort's exclusive two-acre private island, located a 25-minute boat ride away from the main property.

Nanuku, Auberge Resorts Collection BOOK NOW

8 Bora Bora, French Polynesia

Known for its scuba diving and protected coral reefs, Bora Bora in French Polynesia is another remote, castaway type destination for honeymooners who want to get away from it all—and who are up for a big splurge. The Conrad, located on a private cove on the island of Motu To'opua, is the longest stretch of white sand beach in Bora Bora. They have some of the destination's first two story overwater bungalows and one of the most legendary sunsets.

Conrad Bora Bora Nui BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

9 Peninsula Papagayo, Guanacaste, Costa Rica

The 1,400-acre Peninsula Papagayo is an eco-luxury resort and residential community in northwest Costa Rica. Home to exotic wildlife and white-sand beaches it's the ideal jumping off point for exploring Costa Rica’s awe-inspiring nature with your other half. Peninsula Papagayo is home to Four Seasons Resort Costa Rica at Peninsula Papagayo. Couples looking for a mix of hire wire adventure--think zip lining--and some R&R can find it all here.

Four Seasons Costa Rica at Peninsula Papagayo

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10 Nova Scotia, Canada

For those looking for a slightly out of the box honeymoon, the coast of Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia is just the place. Home to two of the top 100 golf courses in North America (ranking No. 43 and No. 9 on Golf Digest’s “World’s 100 Greatest Golf Courses), honeymooners also have access to world-class biking, hiking, and sunset boat tours. A seafood heaven, this is the place to get first rate lobster, crab, salmon, and naturally farmed local produce. Cabot Links is a a secluded 72-room luxury resort with 19 oceanfront villas along the stunning coast of Cape Breton Island.

Cabot Links BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

11 Sorrento, Italy

One of the gateways to the magical and romantic Amalfi Coast, Sorrento, a beautiful cosmopolitan city has the perfect combination of a real town and access to the sea. To have all of this at your fingertips, stay at the luxe Grand Hotel Excelsior Vittoria, which sits above the town harbor and is surrounded by the lush greenery of a 20,000 square meter Mediterranean garden—a perfect place to take the in the scenery with your plus one.

Grand Hotel Excelsior Vittoria BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

12 The Azores, Portugal

Have you heard of the Azores? It's a group of nine islands in the middle of the Atlantic and around a five hour flight from New York City. (Delta has a nonstop route from JFK to Ponta Delgada Memorial Day through Labor Day). Teeming with untapped nature for gourmands and adventure enthusiasts —all for relatively low cost as the area is still relatively undiscovered by tourists. The best way to experience the destination is through Azores Getaways, a customizable tour operator. They've introduced all-new food and wine packages, like allowing (very ambitious) visitors to travel to all nine islands in one trip. The best part is that the packages include accommodations, roundtrip flights, breakfast, airport transfers bundled for easier travel--one less thing for honeymooners to think about.

Azores Getaways BOOK NOW

13 Lord Howe Island, New South Wales, Australia

This crescent-shaped, World Heritage-listed island is the ultimate honeymoon getaway, with good weather and just 400 visitors allowed at any time—it truly feels like your own secluded paradise, one that has the world's most southerly coral reef on its doorstep. Stay at the Capella Lodge, the island's deluxe retreat with nine contemporary island-styled suites. Inspired by the carefree spirit of the authentic Australian beach house, Capella Lodge hits the sweet spot of barefoot luxury.

Capella Lodge BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

14 Puntarenas, Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica

Located in the heart of Costa Rica’s rainforest on the coasts of Golfo Dulce in the Osa Peninsula and accessible only by boat, this area of of the country is worth coming to for Playa Cativo--an upscale beachfront eco-lodge. This five-star Costa Rican hideaway is a wellness haven. You'll find calming ocean waves, lots of wildlife, and exposure to some of the purest, least developed, parts of the world.

Playa Cativo Lodge BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

15 Canouan, The Grenadines

A still somewhat undiscovered part of the Caribbean, Canouan, a 45-minute flight from Barbados, is an unspoiled tropical island offering excellent golf, tennis, deep sea fishing, and saling trips to the Tabago Cays. The Mandarin Oriental picked Canouan for its first resort in the Caribbean. An all suite hotel with top-of-the-line Italian design, honeymooners have their own private butler and lots of options for romantic outings, from a private beach to an uninhabited island.

Mandarin Oriental, Canouan BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

16 Florence, Italy

A honeymoon to Florence gives you a bit of everything—food, seemingly unlimited culture, and easy access to the Tuscan countryside if you are looking for a jumping off point for a more rustic trip. Relais Santa Croce exudes romance and history. Located in 18th century palazzo, the property offers something totally ideal for a party of two: a hot air balloon ride over Tuscany, complete with a champagne breakfast.

Relais Santa Croce BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

17 Nevis

A charming and very low-key island, Nevis is known for its slow, relaxed pace, crystal clear water, and white sand beaches. But for a bit of a change to the typical Caribbean escape, there's Golden Rock Inn, designed by the architects of the famed AMAN resorts, that's an intimate 11-room property located in lush gardens owned by the famed New York artists Brice and Helen Marden. There are hiking trails, exceptional views, and gourmet food, all set against the chic jungle vibe of this higher-altitude part of Nevis.

Golden Rock Inn BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

18 Turtle Island, Fiji

Turtle Island is a 500 square mile island that was privately acquired by a media mogul looking to escape urban burnout. The island is now home to over a million trees, bountiful reefs, and wildlife. The resort Turtle Island has 14 villas that have access to 10 private beaches, a myriad of water and land-based activities, local Fijian dinners inspired by the bounties sourced on-island ingredients. And everything is included in the nightly rate so honeymooners can really just totally bliss out.

Turtle Island BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

19 Tanzania

For true adventure seeking couples, head to Tanzania on a 10-day 62 miles expedition on foot across Serengeti National Park. Trek through the country's most remote and wild regions. This isn't about five-star accommodations--there are no lodges, no roads, no crowds and no smartphones. So it's only walking, fresh cowboy coffee, long lazy lunches, journal-writing, photo-snapping, cold Tanzanian lagers at sundown, hearty meals of curries and stews, storytelling around burning campfires, stargazing and sleeping in a tent to the sounds of roaring lions, owls hooting, and grasses rustling. What some would call Africa at its best.

The Great Serengeti Traverse

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20 Andaman Islands, India

Some of the most remote islands in the world are the Andamans, but worth the trip for its dive sites, beaches, and lush jungles. The Taj Exotica Resort and Spa is the first five-star hotel on Havelock Island, with 50 villas on a 46-acre estate. There are white sand beaches with crystal clear water, kayaking through mangroves, glow in the dark algae, and exceptional hiking and diving.

Taj Exotica Resort and Spa, Andamans

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21 Santorini, Greece

Santorini has long been an iconic honeymoon destination--and for a reason. The amazing light, the sea, and the food all coalesce to create an undeniably magical atmosphere. The Auberge's boutique Grace Hotel in Santorini is located on the Imerovigli hillside in northwest Santorini. For those really looking to splurge and indulge (and if not on your honeymoon, when?), the property has a villa that comes with, among other amenities, its own hammam steam bath, indoor plunge pool, and fire pit.

Grace Hotel BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

22 Mauritius

Located in the Indian Ocean, the island of Mauritius is known for its secluded, exclusive feeling, beaches, and reefs. Embodying all of this is the One & Only Le Saint Geran. Located on a vibrant coral reef, the hotel has modern, lush interiors, every kind of water sport imaginable,and world-class dining. Bottom line: you'll never want to leave.

One & Only Le Saint Geran BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

23 Praiano, Italy

Located next to the more well-know Amalfi Coast destination of Positano, Praiano is a more rustic, and quaint, Italian seaside town that is still, as much as anything can be on the Amalfi Coast can be, under the radar. One thing putting Praiano on the map is the ultra modern hotel Casa Angelina, which has received a "Most Romantic Retreat" award from the Small Luxury Hotels group. The dramatic cliffs, the chic pool club, and floor to ceiling windows make this an ideal destination for honeymooners who are seeking the glamour of the Amalfi Coast but a bit removed from the crowds in a totally contemporary hotel.

Casa Angelina BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

24 Hong Kong

A perfect jumping off point for a honeymoon in Asia, or a destination in and of itself, Hong Kong has one the world's best culinary scenes, beaches and hiking that are an easy day trip, and some of the most deluxe accommodations anywhere. There is no better place to take it all in that the Peninsula Hong Kong, the city's oldest and most legendary hotel, located on the Victoria Harbour's waterfront district in the fashionable Kowloon district of Tsim Sha Tsui. And honeymooners don't even have to leave the hotel to get a dose of culture—the hotel has a global art program called Art in Resonance with curated, interactive pieces by artists from around the world.

The Peninsula Hong Kong

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25 Mallorca, Spain

A short flight from Madrid, Mallorca is a larger island known for its rippling hills, olive and lemon trees,locally grown and sourced food, and, of course, the Mediterranean Sea. Finca Serena is 20 minutes away from Palma, the main town, and is set on a sprawling estate with breathtaking vistas and an over 2,500 square foot spa. Ideal honeymoon activities include lazying around the pool that has far reaching of the Mallorca countryside or a morning yoga class.

Finca Serena BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

26 Sao Paulo, Brazil

One of Brazil's most dynamic cities, which can be a gateway to the rest of the country, is a great urban escape to begin or end a honeymoon. Or for the real city seekers, a place to the spend the whole trip. The first Four Seasons in Brazil opened last year with locally sourced and luxurious finishes. The hotel also offers a "Fall in Love" package.

Four Seasons HotelSão Paulo at Nações Unidas BOOK NOW

27 Abu Dhabi, UAE

On the outskirts of Abu Dhabi lies the world's largest sand desert - called the Empty Quarter, the perfect expanse where couples can dine by the dunes or transverse the miles of open land by camelback. The luxury resort Qasr Al Sarab is the place to make this Arabian fairy tale come true. The palatial resort is in the heart of the Empty Quarter, an unexplored region of barren desert and shimmering oases.

Qasr Al Sarab BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

28 The Blue Lagoon, Iceland

A quick flight from the East Coast, Iceland has a lot to offer aside from proximity: horse back riding, amazing geologic and volcanic features, and hot springs. Now this can all be enjoyed from the Retreat at Blue Lagoon Iceland, a 62 suite hotel where guests have unlimited access to the entire Blue Lagoon facility. There's also an 18-hole golf course a 10-minute drive from the property. So something for everyone.

The Retreat at the Blue Lagoon Iceland

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29 Champagne Region, France

What better way to toast your marriage than in the birthplace of bubbly: the Champagne region of France. Couples can explore miles of UNESCO-certified vineyards, Michelin-starred restaurants, and hot air ballon or boat rides down the Marne River. The Royal Champagne Hotel & Spa is a 49-room boutique hotel with Biologique Recherche spa treatments and private terraces overlooking the surrounding vineyards and villages.

The Royal Champagne Hotel & Spa BOOK NOW

30 Cruise around Greece and Italy

Why just pick one destination for a honeymoon when you can visit many? On the Azamara Club Cruise, couples can visit Venice, Corfu, and Santorini on this nine day cruise along the Dalmatian and Greek Coasts (starts in Venice and ends in Athens). Highlights include hiking with local guides, leisurely driving tours, and gondola rides.

Azamara Club Cruises BOOK NOW

31 Masai Mara, Kenya

Arguably the most renowned safari destination in Africa, home to the big five and stage to the great annual wildebeest migration, and the Masai Mara National Reserve. The Sanctuary Olonana has resident hippos who lounge across the dramatic Mara River, which runs below the lodge's forest setting. And the new Geoffrey Kent Suite is the ultimate splurge, with its two bedrooms, wraparound porch, and infinity pool overlooking the river. After all, this is a once-in-a-lifetime kind of experience—what honeymoons are for!

Sanctuary Olonana BOOK NOW

32 Paris, France

Is there anything more romantic than a trip to Paris? Maybe not? The City of Light could easily be called the City of Love. The Peninsula Paris epitomizes everything that is great about Paris. Located int he city's elegant 16th arrondissement, it's walking distance from some of the world's most famous monuments, museums and luxury shopping districts. It occupies a historic, meticulously restored 19th-century Haussmanian building. The famed rooftop terrace is the perfect spot for newlyweds to enjoy sparkling views of the Eiffel Tower at night.

The Peninsula Paris BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

33 Marrakech, Morocco

An imperial city full of gardens, mosques, and some of the best markets (souks) in the region that sell carpets, jewelry, and everything in between Marrakesh is a more exotic—and exciting—honeymoon destination. Stay a La Monounia, a Moroccan institution since the 1920s. The hotel boasts Jacques Garcia designed interiors under the shade of 700 year old olive groves grown for a Moroccan prince, so certainly meets the standard for a honeymoon.

La Mamounia BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

34 Rome, Italy

A city that exudes romance, culture, and la dolce vita, Rome is a great entry point to the rest of Italy, or a place where honeymooners could spend the whole trip exploring...or eating cacio pepe. Rome Cavalieri, a Waldorf Astoria Resort is a good home base for all of the above, with their aristocratic suites, Rome's only three-Michelin star restaurant, and a reputation for service and elegance since it opened in 1963.

Rome Cavalieri, a Waldorf Astoria Resort BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

35 Canguu, Bali

A not well as known part of Bali Canggu is on Bali's south coast, a laid back coastal village lapped by the Indian Ocean with some of Bali's best surf breaks. COMO Uma Canggu is the first luxury hotel to open in the area. Honeymooners looking to try something new, or practice their already honed skills, will have the opportunity to work with TropicSurf on all kinds of surfing under the watch of an expert eye. The hotel has top-of-the-line Asian and Italian touches and dining menus that rely on locally sourced ingredients.

COMO UMA Canggu BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

36 Rangali Island, the Maldives

Want to spend your honeymoon under the sea? You can on Rangali Island in the Maldvies. The MURAKA has the world's first undersea residence, a two-level residence that has living space both above and below the ocean. Below the surface, guests will find an undersea bedroom, living space and bathroom. Above the water, guests will find a separate bedroom, living room, dining space, and entertainment space. THE MURAKA also offers devoted, 24-hour butler service for all aquatic and land needs.

THE MURAKA at Conrad Maldives Rangali Island

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37 Dorado Beach, Puerto Rico

After devastating hurricanes, Puerto Rico is back and better than ever. Nothing showcases this more than Dorado Beach, Ritz Carlton Reserve, one of the brands most elite categories. Each of the oceanfront guest rooms has gone a transformative renovation. And this treasured Puerto Rican Reserve has seen the addition of more than 300,000 plants, giving honeymooners a tropical paradise to enjoy.

Dorado Beach, a Ritz-Carlton Reserve

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38 Sacred Valley, Peru

Nestled in the heart of the sacred mountains of Peru, Tambo del Inka, a Luxury Collection Resort & Spa offers a perfect honeymoon for adventure-seeking couples. Couples can explore Machu Picchu as a VIP through the resort’s own a private train station, bringing guests directly to the famous Incan Citadel.

Tambo del Inka, a Luxury Collection Resort & Spa

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39 Maalifushi, the Maldives

Situated on the pristine Thaa Atoll in the Maldives, and renowned for its diving and surf breaks, is COMO Maalifushi. COMO Maalifushi is the first and only resort to open on the unspoilt Thaa Atoll, in the archipelago’s southern reaches well regarded for its diving and surf breaks. Accommodations includes 33 overwater villas and suites, and 32 beach villas, suites and garden rooms. Overwater suites and villas are built off wooden walkways that stand above the shallow lagoon, each with its own private terrace and pool, while garden villas and suites are set within the folds of the island’s lush tropical vegetation—yet still only twenty steps from the beach’s high tide mark.

COMO Maalifushi BOOK NOW

40 St. Moritz, Switzerland

Have a bit of everything when you stay in the very heart of Pontresina, an Engadine village just six kilometers from glitzy St. Moritz. You can have the peaceful mountains but access to all the hustle, bustle, and glamour of nearby St. Moritz. Pontresina's only five star hotel is the Grand Hotel Kronenhof that has alpine vistas with the Roseg glacier in the distance, a truly exclusive intimate alpine getaway for any season.

Grand Hotel Kronenhof BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

41 Kyoto, Japan

A peaceful sanctuary in the cultural heart of Japan, Kyoto has beautiful gardens, shrines, old streets, and a rich cultural history. The city's first branded luxury property, The Ritz-Carlton, Kyoto, has Michelin-starred dining, Japanese-inspired spa treatments, and intimate rickshaw rides for newlyweds.

The Ritz Carlton, Kyoto BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

42 Grampian Wine Region, Austraulia

One of Australia’s most acclaimed, yet under-the-radar wine regions is the Grampians Wine Region. Regarded as the birthplace of Australia's sparkling wine industry, the Grampians region has an impressive mix of large and boutique wineries in production since the mid-1800’s, setting the stage for a charming honeymoon with a glass of the region’s signature silky shiraz in hand. Located at the foot of the Grampians in the sleepy little town of Dunkeld, The Royal Mail Hotel has an award-winning restaurant and a 28,000-bottle wine cellar, and many walking tracks that lead to waterfalls, wildlife and jaw dropping lookouts.

The Royal Mail Hotel BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

43 Trancoso, Brazil

Backed by thick jungle on three sides and ocean on the fourth, Trancoso, Brazil has developed separated from the rest of the world, only put on the map, among the hip global elite, by boutique hotel UXUA. The hotel features 11 one-to-three-bedroom casas, all restored using local sustainable materials. Billed as a “fantasy treehouse,” Casa da Avore is one of the most requested casas at the hotel and a favorite among couples for its ultra-private atmosphere inside UXUA’s gardens.

UXUA Casa Hotel & Spa BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

44 St. Tropez, France

Home to society and global jet-setters, St. Tropez is one of the crown jewels of the French Rivera. But if you want to enjoy the nightlife and glitz and glam of St. Tropez but also have a rustic and quite honeymoon, stay just outside at La Réserve Ramatuelle, nestled in a Mediterranean jardin overlooking the Côte D’Azur. This Spring, the property is lifting the veil on its first-ever beach club, La Réserve à la Plage. Located on the famous Pampelonne Beach and designed by Philipe Starck

La Réserve Ramatuelle BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

45 Mayan Riviera, Mexico

Set on the Caribbean coast of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, the Mayan Rivera is Mexico at its best--laid back, warm hospitality, and amazing beach front to enjoy. The Viceroy Riviera Maya is an adults-only couples getaway, e.g. perfect a honeymoon. Each villa features a patio, plunge pool, outdoor shower, and high-ceiling thatched-palapa. So no reason to leave your room, really.

Viceroy Riviera Maya BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

46 Nantucket, Massachusetts

Miles of public beaches, New England charm, and a burgeoning food scene, Nantucket is the perfect place for a honeymoon or perhaps a mini moon. Stay a bit removed from the center of town on the northeast end of Nantucket, bordering the peaceful Coskata-Coatue Wildlife Refuge at The Wauwinet, a private, adults-only escape which just underwent a million-dollar restoration and renovation – the first major renovation in its 30-year history. Watch the sunset over dinner at TOPPER’s, located between two private beaches. Visit the family-owned Bartlett’s Farm for fresh fruits and vegetables – ideal for a picnic lunch. Tip: book the Coatue Suite which includes a private sundeck facing the bay.

The Wauwinet BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

47 Mnemba Island, Zanzibar

As we've mentioned, it doesn’t get much more romantic than being on a private island with your new spouse. Off the north-eastern tip of Zanzibar lies the private andBeyond Mnemba Island, made up of just 10 thatched bands and inhabited only by guests and the staff taking care of them. Less than a mile in circumference, Mnemba is surrounded by the clear turquoise water and coral reefs, offering some of Africa’s most best dive sites. Shaded traditional Zanzibari ‘beach’ beds are located along the sand, offering the perfect place to cuddle up with a loved one. Other romantic touches include private dinners served on the beach or a sunset cruise on a Dhow, a local Swahili-style sailboat.

andBeyond Mnemba Island BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

48 Casole d'Elsa SI, Italy

Tuscany is high of many people's bucket lists. And for good reason. The rolling hills, proximity to mega centers of culture like Florence, and Sienna, and the food and wine. Head to Casole d'Elsa, Belmond Castello di Casole's is a 4,200-acre property is one of the largest private estates in Italy and features just 39 spacious suites. A former castle dating back to the 10th century, modern creature comforts include: the Essere Spa, the newly launched Enchanted Table and a new an alfresco dining option situated underneath the same tree where Visconti used to conjure up his next film.

Belmond Castello di Casole's BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

49 Ireland by rail

Ready to go old school and take a train as part, or all, of your honeymoon. The Belmond Grand Hibernian is Ireland's first luxury sleeper train. Expect artisan cheeses, seafood, and local whiskies in the two dining cabins, plus an observation car that will serve as a social gathering place with local spirits including Irish gin and local music. Itinerary highlights include tours to Blarney Castle to see the Blarney Stone, a private tasting at Jameson distillery, and a city tour of Galway.

The Belmond Grand Hibernian BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

50 Jaipur, India

This imperial, pink city is a great stop-over on any journey to India, or Asia for that matter. Known for its literary festival, unique jewelry, and beautiful palaces, Jaipur is both very interesting and romantic. The Rambaugh Palace is one of the city's most iconic hotels--and a five-star luxury hotel that blends new and old world seamlessly.

Rambaugh Palace BOOK NOW READ REVIEWS

Chennai: Vacationers are shifting their Sri Lankan holiday plans to Indonesia, Thailand and Maldives with travel portals witnessing a 30% increase to the Asian destinations.
“We are beginning to see a shift in inquiries away from Sri Lanka and travellers are asking for alternate destinations such as Thailand (which just introduced visa on arrival) and Kerala in India. The change would be 20%,” said Karan Anand, head, relationships, Cox and Kings. Trip curator Pickyourtrail observes that Bali has higher interest as it has more things like Sri Lanka such as - adventure, culture, lesiure – followed by Maldives, which is leisure oriented.
Vacationers are also willing to stretch their budget by nearly 10% to accommodate the shift to neighbouring destinations.

Cox & Kings’ Anand adds that while the domestic travel costs remain the same, airfares to Kerala have risen by 10-15%, indicating more people visiting Kerala.

Travel fintech startup Sankash received over 250 last minute applications for loans to Thailand.
“Those who have planned for premium trips in Sri Lanka are going for budget trips in neighbouring countries in South East Asia. And these are for trips in May. Those who are due to travel in June are waiting for the situation to get better,” said Akash Dahiya, CEO, Sankash.
Self-drive car rental companies are also seeing a rise in requests, scrambling last minute to accommodate limited inventory of cars.
Aditya Loomba, joint managing director, Eco Rent a Car-EuropCar said, “However, we at Eco Rent A Car-Europcar is seeing 40%-45% of traction for International Locations like Thailand, Dubai, etc and for local destinations like Goa, Andaman, a few hill stations like Coorg, Kasauli and Mussoorie.”

We’ve reached an exciting moment in family travel: not only are parents increasingly willing to take their kids to locales farther from home, but children themselves are driving their whole families’ decisions about where to go and what to do. (And as hotels adapt and expand their offerings, parents are also having more fun as a result.)

Every year for the World’s Best Awards, Travel + Leisure asks readers to rank travel experiences across the globe — to share their opinions on the top hotels, resorts, cities, islands, cruise lines, spas, airlines, and more. Readers taking the WBA survey considered how well hotels of all stripes — from ultra-luxe safari lodges to ski resorts and all-inclusive island escapes — cater to families. (The 2019 survey is still open, and you can vote for your favorites until March 4.)

The most recent list of picks reflects several iconic domestic destinations — including Florida, the Caribbean, and New England — along with other choices much further afield, in places like Rivas, Nicaragua, and Bangalore, India. But regardless of the geography, it’s clear that T+L readers prioritize a constellation of family-friendly activities, amenities, inventive children’s and teen programming, and accommodations that work for groups of all ages and sizes. Here, the Top 50 family-friendly properties around the world as chosen by T+L readers.

Thailand’s Maya Bay used to be a quiet cove teeming with marine life, visited by only a handful of tourists each day. Then came the 2000 film “The Beach” starring Leonardo DiCaprio, about a young American adventurer on an exotic island. By 2018, 5,000 tourists were visiting the bay, where the film had been shot, each day. Marine experts reported severe damage to the reef from boat anchors and snorkelers wearing sunscreen that contained a common chemical toxic to juvenile corals. Thailand’s national parks department announced that more than 50 percent of the bay’s corals showed signs of damage, prompting the agency to close Maya Bay indefinitely “until natural resources return to normal.”

In the Philippines, the tiny island paradise of Boracay, covering 4 square miles, was overrun by 2 million visitors in 2017, many of them from cruise ships. Last year, with hundreds of businesses and residences dumping sewage into the sea, authorities closed the island for six months to undertake a large-scale cleanup operation and developed plans to cut the number of visitors by two-thirds.

And in Vietnam, the country’s most popular tourism destination, Ha Long Bay, with its thousands of limestone islands of all shapes and sizes rising out of the sea — has experienced a huge increase in tourists whose sheer numbers are fouling the ecosystem. Officials say that in 2017, nearly 7 million tourists visited the bay, a UNESCO World Heritage Site; roughly half were international visitors, many of them from China. Hundreds of ships ply the bay each day, often discharging human waste into the sea. Tourists increasingly express surprise not at the landscape, but at the amount of trash in the water or the crowds.

“I would argue that tourism has not only been badly managed, it’s not been managed at all,” says one expert.

Around the world, burgeoning numbers of tourists — many of them from nations with millions of new middle-class travelers — are putting pressure on legendary natural areas, from the mountains of Patagonia, to the national parks of the western United States, to the Arctic landscapes of Iceland. But nowhere is the problem more acute than in Southeast Asia, famed for its beaches, tropical forests, and far-flung islands. Not only are the economies of Southeast Asian nations heavily geared to, and dependent on, foreign tourism, but the region’s vacation destinations are also close to China, whose citizens made an estimated 150 million trips abroad last year — a 15-fold increase from 2000.

Andrew Hewett, with the Thailand-based Phi Phi Island Conservation and Preservation Group, says that the face and mode of tourism in Southeast Asia has changed significantly in the last 10 to 12 years. Most of the region’s tourists used to come from Australia, the U.S., Europe, and Japan, with many of them arriving in small groups or as backpackers. Today, China and India dominate the tourist ranks, their travelers often arriving in what Hewett calls “mass charter groups.” Larger groups mean bigger boats, with more oil and waste discharged in the water. They also mean more garbage and human waste, and more damage to sensitive marine and terrestrial environments.

Until recently, many Southeast Asian nations, grateful for new jobs and surging revenue, have done little to address the growing threat to the natural environments that attracted tourists in the first place.

“I would argue that tourism has not only been badly managed in general, it’s not been managed at all,” said Randy Durband, chief executive officer of the Global Sustainable Tourism Council. “Southeast Asia is one of the most dramatic regions in the world for the issues we’re talking about.”

Vacationers sit amid scattered plastic waste on Kuta Beach, one of Bali's top tourist destinations.

Vacationers sit amid scattered plastic waste on Kuta Beach, one of Bali's top tourist destinations. Agung Parameswara/Getty Images

The sheer number of tourists now pouring into Southeast Asia is “eye-popping,” according to Megan Epler Wood, director of the International Sustainable Tourism Initiative at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the president of EplerWood International, a company that helps locales develop sustainable tourism. Thailand, one of the world’s top 10 countries for international tourism, welcomed more than 38 million visitors in 2018, a three-fold increase from 15 years ago. From 2016 to 2017, the number of foreign tourists visiting Vietnam grew by 30 percent, and then by an additional 2.5 million visitors the following year, bringing the total number of foreign tourists in Vietnam in 2018 to 15.5 million.

A report released late last month by The Travel Foundation, Cornell University, and EplerWood International found that local capacity to manage environmental impacts from tourism is lacking in much of Southeast Asia.

“The invisible burden is the social and environmental impacts of tourism that are not accounted for when countries look at economic impacts,” says Epler Wood, a co-author of the Travel Foundation report. “There’s a cost as each tourist comes into a country. It’s not equally distributed throughout the economy, and where it fails is in the protection of the environment.”

The crush of tourists into areas such as Maya Beach, Ha Long Bay, or Bali extracts an environmental toll in several key ways. One is the handling and treatment of human waste. A second is the mountains of garbage and plastic bags piling up in places that once received thousands of visitors annually and now receive millions. And a third is the damage to the environment as legions of tourists disembark from cruise ships or planes and fan out across fragile ecosystems.

After unregulated discharge of sewage turned Boracay’s waters into a “cesspool,” authorities closed the island to tourists for six months.

Boracay Island in the Philippines, once named by Travel and Leisure magazine as the world’s best island, serves as a cautionary tale of what can happen to a once-paradisiacal spot that finds itself flooded with tourists. As more and more visitors poured onto the island in recent years to enjoy its white sand beaches and turquoise waters by day and raucous party scene by night, the island’s environment reached the breaking point. A government survey found that 716 of 834 businesses and residences lacked wastewater permits and many were discharging sewage into the sea. Armies of tourists, sometimes reaching nearly 20,000 a day, were strewing trash about the island and disturbing wildlife, including sea turtles.

Last April, after Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte said the unregulated discharge of sewage had turned Boracay’s limpid waters into a “cesspool,” authorities closed the island to tourists for six months. They limited the number of tourists to 6,400 a day, required hotels and other businesses to install proper sewage treatment systems, mandated that tourists stay in government-accredited hotels with proper sanitation, banned single-use plastics, created steep fines for littering, and required Jet Skis to operate more than 100 meters offshore. The island has been largely reopened to tourists since October, although officials say Boracay’s rehabilitation will take at least two years.

“I believe the closure served its purpose of giving Boracay the much needed rest it deserves and allowing for improvements,” says John Paolo R. Rivera, associate director of the Andrew L. Tan Center for Tourism at the Philippines-based Asian Institute of Management. “Boracay must only permit quality tourists. [It] should not be positioned as an island that is known for parties, but rather an island that is an example of sustainable tourism.”

Police officers collect trash on Boracay Island in the Philippines last April, days after the popular beach destination was closed to tourists to address pollution problems.

Police officers collect trash on Boracay Island in the Philippines last April, days after the popular beach destination was closed to tourists to address pollution problems. REUTERS/Erik De Castro

Similarly overrun, Maya Beach in Thailand remains closed to tourists. Declared off-limits to visitors in June 2018, the government initially planned to reopen the resort by last October, but has decided to keep Maya Beach shuttered for the foreseeable future. The main restoration work involves replanting corals on the resort’s badly damaged reefs. With the swarms of tourists gone, some marine life is returning to Maya Beach, including dozens of blacktip reef sharks caught on video last fall.

Another fragile Southeast Asian ecosystem facing growing tourism pressure, and a looming closure, is Komodo National Park in eastern Indonesia. This is the only habitat on the planet for the Komodo dragon, the world’s largest lizard, as well as other species such as the dugong, a marine mammal, and 260 different species of corals. The number of visitors coming to Komodo Island to snorkel its spectacular coral reefs, swim beneath waterfalls, kayak through mangrove forests, and see the Komodo dragon has doubled in recent years, from 80,000 in 2014 to 159,000 last year.

A recent upgrade to the airport nearest to Komodo Island will expand the airfield’s capacity to 1.5 million passengers annually, putting further pressure on the park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Cruise ships, carrying up to 1,200 passengers, also are calling on the park more frequently. Developers are hoping to cash in on the increasing number of visitors, but conservationists and government officials are concerned about environmental pressures such as pollution, freshwater shortages, and habitat destruction.

Strategies are needed “to conserve the integrity of the destination — the very reason why travelers are drawn to the region.”

Officials have been contemplating the temporary closure of the island to give the Komodo dragon’s realm a chance to recover. After wildlife traffickers were busted in late March poaching 41 Komodo dragons and selling them at $35,000 apiece on the black market, local provincial officials announced plans to close park starting in January 2020. But Indonesia’s Environment and Forestry Ministry, which manages the park, said no final decision has been made.

Epler Wood says she and her colleagues believe closures should be considered only as a last resort. “We don’t advocate a closing unless it’s an emergency,” she says. “We recommend balanced management that looks at supply and demand and measured responses based on planning and science that involves regular benchmarking, like water testing, so you can see when they’re getting close to a problem, which should trigger action.”

James Sano, the World Wildlife Fund’s vice president for travel, tourism, and conservation, says the Southeast Asia’s travel boom is a clear threat to the region’s “natural and cultural resources.” He says that all involved, including the travel industry and local and national officials, must develop strategies to deal with environmental, cultural, and economic impacts “to conserve the integrity of the destination — the very reason why travelers are drawn to the region.”

Popular tourist spots such as Vietnam’s Ha Long Bay are facing growing pressure to do something before millions of tourists debase the breathtaking environments they came to see. In Ha Long Bay, a coalition of government officials, local businesses, grassroots organizations, and international groups such as the International Union for Conservation of Nature are working to improve water quality. These efforts include collaborating with tour boat operators to install waste treatment technologies on their vessels. But whether these efforts will prove effective in the face of growing numbers of tourists clamoring to see Vietnam’s iconic tourist destination remains to be seen.

Nearly 7 million tourists visited Ha Long Bay in Vietnam in 2017, fouling waters with human waste and garbage.

Nearly 7 million tourists visited Ha Long Bay in Vietnam in 2017, fouling waters with human waste and garbage. HOANG DINH NAM/AFP/Getty Images

The Indonesian Island of Bali has for years been trying to cope with ever-increasing numbers of tourists. Bali’s international airport received more than 5 million foreign tourists in 2018, a five-fold increase since 2001. The scale of environmental problems has grown in parallel with the number of tourists, including overuse of freshwater, air pollution, habitat destruction, and the generation of large amounts of garbage. More than 1,700 acres of land are developed annually in Bali. Each four-star hotel room uses 80 gallons of water a day.

Officials in Bali have proposed a $10 tax levied on international passengers flying through the island’s airport, which would be used to fund programs to preserve Bali’s culture and environment, with a focus on tackling the island’s waste management problem. The island produces 3,800 tons of garbage daily, with only 60 percent of it going to landfills, according to the Bali Environment Agency. Last December, Bali banned single-use plastics, such as shopping bags and straws.

A number of regions are taking steps to stem the damage from tourism by improving traveler awareness. Facing threats from mass tourism, the western Pacific archipelago of Palau — known for spectacular hiking, bird watching, snorkeling, and diving — now requires visitors to sign an environmental pledge promising not to damage the environment during their stay. Stamped in travelers’ passports, it reads, “I vow to tread lightly, act kindly, and explore mindfully. I shall not take what is not given. I shall not harm what does not harm me.”

Elisheva Mittelman contributed reporting to this story.

Correction, April 22, 2019: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that Komodo National Park will be closing to tourists in 2020. While local officials have called for its closure, no final decision has been made by Indonesia’s Environment and Forestry Ministry, which manages the park.

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SINGAPORE, 9 April 2019: A global travel firm halted Brunei Airlines ticket sales at the weekend lending support to the #Bruneiboycott campaign while at least four more hotels popped up on the radar owned by Brunei’s investment agency.

STA Travel offices in the UK, US and Australia
tweeted at the weekend: “In protest at recent changes to the law in Brunei
(also applicable on Brunei-registered aircraft and vessels), we’re proud to
announce that STA Travel has stopped selling tickets on Royal Brunei Airlines.

‏The Financial Times reported Saturday: “Gary Donoghue, the founder of London-based boutique travel company All World Journeys, which has a ‘preferred partner’ relationship with the Hotel Eden in Rome, said he would be advising clients against booking any of the Dorchester hotels.

“We have a number of business and leisure
clients who are LGBQT+,” he said, adding that the ruling was “a slam against”
the values of openness and hospitality in travel.”

Closer to home in the Asia-Pacific and off the radar, for now, four hotels have been identified that are financially linked to Brunei through the Brunei Investment Agency and its subsidiary Sejahtera Investments.

So far they have managed to dodge the
attention of boycott campaigners unlike the nine properties of Dorchester
Collection in the US and Europe.

That changed at the weekend when Australian
media identified Brisbane’s Royal on the Park as being owned by Sejahtera One
(Australia), which is part of the Brunei Investment Agency. 

Sejahtera One has just a single shareholder,
Brunei Investment Agency, which is Brunei’s sovereign wealth fund with an
estimated worth of USD40 billion.

Three hotels in Southeast Asia — two in
Singapore and one in Bali — are according to independent reports owned by BIA
through Sejahtera Investments or another subsidiary Borneo Properties.

According to the 2017 Directory of Registered Star Hotels in Bali, Nusa Dua Beach Resort and Spa, in Bali Indonesia, is owned and operated by Sejahtera INDOC PT, the Indonesian subsidiary of BIA.

Royal Plaza on Scotts and the Grand Hyatt Singapore are owned by Sejahtera Investments and Borneo Properties both subsidiaries of the Brunei Investment Agency.

Although Grand Hyatt Singapore is managed by Hyatt, registration details confirm the property’s owning company is Borneo Properties. Other documents accessible on the Internet confirm Borneo Properties is a unit of BIA. (See link at close of this report).

Sejahtera Investments has its registered
office in the Royal Plaza on Scotts building and the hotel’s management in
response to an email from TTR Weekly confirmed Sajahtera Investments
(Singapore) Pte Limited is the owning company.

It was one of the Sultan’s first investments in the hotel industry, originally branded Holiday Inn when it opened in 1974. Today it is owned and managed directly by Sejahtera Investments.

Both hotels are popular choices for
tourists from Australia and Europe who want to stay close to Orchard Road.

TTR Weekly sent emails to all three hotels seeking further clarification on ownership and whether ownership changes might have been made since 2018 that were not updated in the public information space. Nusa Dua Beach Resort has not responded at this time but Grand Hyatt Singapore issued an email statement this morning.

Hyatt’s regional vice president marketing communications, Karen Chung, confirmed in the email to TTR Weekly early this morning (9 April) the hotel is owned by Borneo Properties and managed by Hyatt.

“At Hyatt…We value and respect diversity
and hold a deep respect for individual beliefs, rights and customs of the
people and the communities in which our hotels operate.

“In 2018, Hyatt underscored its
company-wide support for the LGBTI community by signing on to the United
Nations LGBTI Standards of Conduct for Business and affirmed our commitment to
support several core standards of conduct to protect LGBTI people around the
globe from discrimination.”

#Bruneiboycott campaign gained considerable
momentum this week when London Transport pulled advertising across all of its
transport options that promoted Brunei and its national airline as an “abode of
peace.”

Major companies, such as Deutsche Bank, have
removed the Brunei-owned hotels as options for staff travel.

According to the Independent Newspaper, “The
University of Aberdeen and King’s College London have already confirmed they
are reviewing the honorary degrees they have given to the sultan, while 40,000
people have signed a petition calling on the University of Oxford, which gave
him an honorary diploma in 1993, to follow suit.”

The boycott got underway 31 March when
Brunei announced harsh penalties under Syariah law including stoning for
same-sex offences as well as adultery.

Launched by actor George Clooney and supported by Elton John the campaign initially focused on boycotting nine hotels owned by BIA under the Dorchester Collection brand.

Nine
luxury hotels

The Dorchester, London, UK
The Beverly Hills Hotel, Beverly Hills, USA
Plaza Athénée, Paris, France
Le Meurice, Paris, France
Principe di Savoia, Milan, Italy
Hotel Bel-Air, Los Angeles, USA
Coworth Park, Ascot, UK
45 Park Lane, London, UK
Hotel Eden, Rome, Italy

The social media accounts of the nine Brunei-owned hotels have since been deleted or made inaccessible to stem the flood of negative posts.

The backlash against the hotel chain also forced
TripAdvisor to close reviews for the hotels on its platform following a spike
in negative posts.

However, the boycott widened from hotels to
include Royal Brunei Airlines when it became apparent that harsh anti-gay legislation
could apply passengers once they boarded the national airline.

It flies to London and Melbourne and many
of its passengers fly between the two cities with a stop in Brunei to change
planes.

Homosexuality has been illegal in Brunei since the country was a British colony, but the new law makes it punishable by death by stoning for gay sex and extramarital affairs.

Measured and rational comments on social
media point out that the campaign is not targeting the country’s right to
introduce Syariah law, but rather the harsh penalties for sex offences such as
stoning, canning and for theft amputation of a foot or hand that are out of
context with commonly accepted human rights in today’s world.

Not a single travel company, hotel booking site, international hotel group or travel association in Asia has come out in support of the #bruneiboycott campaign.

(Reported updated 0800, 9 April with Grand Hyatt Singapore email statement)

EMIS company profiles 
https://www.emis.com/php/company-profile/SG/Borneo_Properties_Sdn_Bhd_en_2314521.html

Registered Star rated hotels in Bali 2017

Star Hotels – Bali Provincial Tourism Service